Google+ Integration

Apr 9th

Consumer Search Insights.
As publishers we tend to be quite concerned with the over-promotion of Google+ because it carves up the search landscape, is potentially another hoop that we have to jump through, and in some cases, the Google+ hosted version of a page will outrank the legitimate original source - which screws up the economics of online publishing.

But do users care about how Google+ was integrated directly into the search results? Generally no.

How do you feel Google+ integration has impacted Google's relevancy?

Under 1 in 5 people said it made the search results better, under 1 in 5 said it made the search results worse & over 3 in 5 didn't notice any material impact.

vote All (1260) 
no noticeable impact 64.7% (+3.3 / -3.5)
made it better 17.4% (+2.9 / -2.6)
made it worse 17.9% (+3.0 / -2.7)

Men liked it slightly more than women. However, that difference was within the estimated range of error. If this difference was more significant one might guestimate that women are better at socializing offline & have less need for artificial web relationships, given their relatively larger corpus callosum. ;)

vote Men (875)  Women (385) 
no noticeable impact 64.1% (+3.4 / -3.6) 65.3% (+5.5 / -5.9)
made it better 18.7% (+3.0 / -2.6) 16.2% (+5.2 / -4.1)
made it worse 17.2% (+2.9 / -2.6) 18.5% (+5.3 / -4.4)

Older people are less likely to have loads of online friends & relationships (as they spent most of their lives building relationships in the physical world, before the web or online social networks were popular). Older people also tend to be more set in their ways. Thus many older people won't be signed up for Google+ & won't notice as much of an impact from it.

Younger people are more likely to want to try out new technology, thus they are more likely to notice an impact from it. Some generations tend to be more isolated & individualistic (like the baby boomers) while millennials tend to like to work in groups & network more (it isn't an accident that Facebook started on a college campus & targeted college students), thus younger people are not only more likely to notice something like Google+, but they are also more likely to like its impact.

vote 18-24 year-olds (334)  25-34 year-olds (322)  35-44 year-olds (141)  45-54 year-olds (204)  55-64 year-olds (167)  65+ year-olds (93) 
no noticeable impact 59.8% (+5.1 / -5.4) 64.0% (+5.4 / -5.7) 66.6% (+7.3 / -8.2) 59.3% (+6.6 / -7.0) 65.7% (+6.9 / -7.7) 73.9% (+8.1 / -10.1)
made it better 26.6% (+5.0 / -4.4) 18.8% (+5.0 / -4.1) 16.3% (+7.2 / -5.3) 19.1% (+6.2 / -4.9) 16.4% (+6.7 / -5.0) 7.9% (+8.7 / -4.3)
made it worse 13.6% (+4.1 / -3.3) 17.2% (+4.8 / -3.9) 17.1% (+7.4 / -5.5) 21.6% (+6.0 / -5.0) 17.9% (+6.5 / -5.0) 18.2% (+9.9 / -7.0)

I didn't notice any obvious trends or patterns aligned with locations across the country.

vote The US Midwest (267)  The US Northeast (360)  The US South (378)  The US West (255) 
no noticeable impact 65.5% (+6.7 / -7.3) 61.3% (+7.3 / -7.8) 67.6% (+5.6 / -6.1) 62.4% (+6.6 / -7.1)
made it better 16.2% (+6.2 / -4.7) 20.5% (+7.8 / -6.1) 17.2% (+5.0 / -4.1) 16.5% (+6.3 / -4.8)
made it worse 18.4% (+6.9 / -5.3) 18.2% (+6.3 / -4.9) 15.1% (+5.6 / -4.3) 21.1% (+6.6 / -5.3)

Suburban people were more likely to notice an impact, though they were not heavily skewed in one way or the other

vote Urban areas (669)  Rural areas (124)  Suburban areas (450) 
no noticeable impact 65.9% (+4.1 / -4.4) 66.8% (+9.0 / -10.4) 62.0% (+4.7 / -5.0)
made it better 16.4% (+3.7 / -3.1) 14.3% (+8.5 / -5.7) 20.4% (+4.4 / -3.8)
made it worse 17.6% (+3.9 / -3.3) 18.9% (+9.8 / -7.0) 17.6% (+4.2 / -3.6)

People who earned less were less likely to notice positive or negative impact from Google+ integration (somewhat surprising since younger people tend to skew toward lower incomes & younger people were more likely to notice & like Google+ integration). Outside of that, the data is too bunched up to see any other significant patterns based on income.

vote People earning $0-24K (162)  People earning $25-49K (698)  People earning $50-74K (312)  People earning $75-99K (71) 
no noticeable impact 71.1% (+7.8 / -9.2) 62.8% (+4.4 / -4.6) 61.9% (+6.3 / -6.8) 61.3% (+10.6 / -11.9)
made it better 14.8% (+8.8 / -5.9) 17.5% (+4.0 / -3.4) 18.9% (+5.9 / -4.8) 17.1% (+11.5 / -7.5)
made it worse 14.1% (+9.5 / -6.1) 19.7% (+4.3 / -3.7) 19.2% (+6.4 / -5.1) 21.6% (+11.2 / -8.1)
Published: April 9, 2012

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